Maynard Selbe Pointe
Module Name:
Mainard Selbe Pointe
Diorama:
Store Layout
Owner Name:
CNS Hobbies
Sponsor:
Fearless Leader
Date Built:
2003
Date Updated:
 
Status:
Assigned to permanent layout at Challenger N-Scale Hobbies
Module Type:
3' corner w/ permanently attached legs
Length:
51"
Width:
25.5"
Skyboard:
12" laminated
Track
Code:
80
Brand:
Atlas
Turnouts:
none
Crossovers:
none
Passing Sidings:
none
Yard Tracks
none
Industrial Spurs
none
Other Tracks
none
Electrical:
Wire
Connector
110V
Designer:
Joe "Slim" Lovett
 
Red
18 gauge
C-J
 
Carpentry:
Joe "Slim" Lovett
 
Yellow
18 gauge
C-J
 
Track:
Pyro
 
Blue
18 gauge
C-J
 
Wiring:
Razor
 
Other
     
Scenery:
under construction
DCC Equipment:
none
Powered Accessories:
none
Scenery:
Oklahoma Scene:
 
Route 66 Scene:
 
Prototype RR:
 
Maynard Selbe Pointe
Sign Board
One of our long time members (not Mainard Selbe!) passed on a few years ago. In his memory a caricature bust was sculptured. We received a lot of questions about it at shows, and eventually decided that it would be better if the bust was displayed on the permanent layout at the store. We built a rock outcrop with the intention of doing the bust in a Mount Rushmore style presentation, and that's as far as we got. The mountain was built with layers of blue and pink foam, carved, but never painted. One day a customer brought his young daughter with him to the train store. The little girl said "Oh, Daddy, that mountain looks like an ice cream cone!" Soon thereafter the mountain was painted, awaiting ground cover and finishing touches. And that's where it stands today. It isn't completed yet, and there is now a betting pool on when, if ever, the module will be finished.
Description & History
When our sponsor, Challenger N-Scale Hobbies, moved to its current location we decided that we should assign some older modules to a semi-permanently store layout. Not having any spare corners, we chose to build a set of four smaller, 3' corners that would remain with the store layout. Because they would not be travelling, these modules had permanent legs rather than fold-up legs.